Keynote Speaker: Jeff Duncan-Andrade, PhD

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Jeff Duncan-Andrade, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Raza Studies and Education Administration and Interdisciplinary Studies. In addition to these duties, he continues as a high school teacher in East Oakland where for the past 18 years he has practiced and studied the use of critical pedagogy in urban schools. He currently teaches English at Mandela High School in East Oakland. Before joining the faculty at SFSU, Duncan-Andrade taught English and coached in the Oakland public schools for 10 years, and completed his doctoral studies at the University of California, Berkeley. Duncan-Andrade has lectured around the world about the elements of effective teaching in schools serving poor and working class children.

He works closely with teachers, school site leaders, and school district officials nationally, and as far abroad as Brazil and New Zealand, to help them develop classroom practices and school cultures that foster self-confidence, esteem, and academic success among all students. His research interests and publications span the areas of urban schooling and curriculum change, urban teacher development and retention, critical pedagogy, and cultural and ethnic studies. He has authored numerous journal articles and book chapters on the conditions of urban education, urban teacher support and development, and effective pedagogy in urban settings (see http://cci.sfsu.edu/taxonomy/term/68) that have been published in leading journals such as Harvard Educational Review and Qualitative Studies in Education.

He recently completed two books, The Art of Critical Pedagogy: Possibilities for Moving from Theory to Practice in Urban Schools and What a Coach Can Teach a Teacher, with Peter Lang Publishing. These books focus on effective pedagogical strategies for urban schools. He is currently completing his third book on the core competencies of highly effective urban educators with Routledge Press.

Keynote Speaker: Karen Valdes, PhD

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Dr. Karen Valdes serves as the assistant superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction in the Menifee Union School District. Prior to her current post, she served as a curriculum coordinator and then regional director for the Riverside County Office of Education. Valdes received her bachelor’s degree and elementary credential, as well as her master’s degree, in educational psychology, with an emphasis in special education, from Loyola Marymount University. She holds special education credentials as well as a resource specialist program certificate. In addition, she has a bilingual certificate of competence. She completed her doctorate in organizational leadership at Argosy University. Presently, she is an adjunct professor at Pepperdine University.

Valdes started her career in the Lennox School District in Los Angeles. She held teaching positions in Norwalk La Mirada Unified School District and Temecula Valley Unified School District. Twice named Teacher of the Year at Temecula Valley Unified School District, she was named Riverside County Teacher of the Year in 1987. Dr. Valdes also worked a number of years for the United States Department of Education, in the Teacher to Teacher program.

In 2016, she was appointed by the State Board of Education to serve on the California Practitioners Advisory Panel (CPAG). Valdes is active in numerous organizations, including the Menifee Boys and Girls Club Board of Directors where she is a member. She is also a member of the Board of Directors for California Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (CASCD).

Breakout Session Speakers

  Dr. Marco Bravo, Santa Clara University     Breakout Session Topic: Supporting English Learners Acquiring the Language of Science and Science Learning    Marco A. Bravo received his bachelor's degree from Santa Clara University (1994) and Master’s degree in Human Development and Psychology from Harvard University (1995) where he conducted research in the areas of bilingualism and early childhood reading development. In 2003 Dr. Bravo completed his doctoral studies at the University of California Berkeley Graduate School of Education in Language, Literacy and Culture. He was a Postdoctoral Fellow (2003) at the Lawrence Hall of Science where he authored several children's science trade books as part of a research and curriculum development project aimed at testing the possibilities and limits of science and literacy integration. He is a former Spanish/English bilingual first grade teacher and Adult ESL instructor. His current research is funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of Education. This quasi-experimental design study probes pre-service teacher dispositions toward teaching science to diverse learners, particularly English Learners.

Dr. Marco Bravo, Santa Clara University

Breakout Session Topic: Supporting English Learners Acquiring the Language of Science and Science Learning

Marco A. Bravo received his bachelor's degree from Santa Clara University (1994) and Master’s degree in Human Development and Psychology from Harvard University (1995) where he conducted research in the areas of bilingualism and early childhood reading development. In 2003 Dr. Bravo completed his doctoral studies at the University of California Berkeley Graduate School of Education in Language, Literacy and Culture. He was a Postdoctoral Fellow (2003) at the Lawrence Hall of Science where he authored several children's science trade books as part of a research and curriculum development project aimed at testing the possibilities and limits of science and literacy integration. He is a former Spanish/English bilingual first grade teacher and Adult ESL instructor. His current research is funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of Education. This quasi-experimental design study probes pre-service teacher dispositions toward teaching science to diverse learners, particularly English Learners.

  Dr. Gilberto Q. Conchas, Executive Director of the Career Academy Support Network      Breakout Session Topic: Cracks in the Schoolyard—Confronting Latino Educational Inequality    Gilberto Q. Conchas is currently Executive Director of the Career Academy Support Network (CASN) at U.C. Berkeley and Associate Professor and Chancellor’s Fellow at the University of California, Irvine.  In addition, he is Faculty Equity and Diversity Advisor for UCI.   Dr. Conchas’ work focuses on inequality with an emphasis on urban schooling systems.  His research illuminates student voices and perspectives as a means to make meaning of their lives in urban communities and schools. Dr. Conchas focuses on the sociocultural processes within the school context that structure variations in educational opportunity for low-income immigrant and U.S-born Latino, Asian American, and African American youth. Numerous scholarly journals, including the Harvard Educational Review, Research in Sociology of Education, Urban Education, Youth & Society, and Teachers College Record, have published Dr. Conchas’ work.  He is the author of The Color of Success: Race and High-Achieving Urban Youth (2006), Small Schools and Urban Youth: Using the Power of School Culture to Engage Youth (2008), and StreetSmart SchoolSmart: Urban Poverty and the Education of Boys of Color (forthcoming). Conchas obtained a Ph.D. and M.A. in Sociology from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor and a B.A. in Sociology from the University of California, Berkeley.

Dr. Gilberto Q. Conchas, Executive Director of the Career Academy Support Network

Breakout Session Topic: Cracks in the Schoolyard—Confronting Latino Educational Inequality

Gilberto Q. Conchas is currently Executive Director of the Career Academy Support Network (CASN) at U.C. Berkeley and Associate Professor and Chancellor’s Fellow at the University of California, Irvine.  In addition, he is Faculty Equity and Diversity Advisor for UCI. 

Dr. Conchas’ work focuses on inequality with an emphasis on urban schooling systems.  His research illuminates student voices and perspectives as a means to make meaning of their lives in urban communities and schools. Dr. Conchas focuses on the sociocultural processes within the school context that structure variations in educational opportunity for low-income immigrant and U.S-born Latino, Asian American, and African American youth. Numerous scholarly journals, including the Harvard Educational Review, Research in Sociology of Education, Urban Education, Youth & Society, and Teachers College Record, have published Dr. Conchas’ work.  He is the author of The Color of Success: Race and High-Achieving Urban Youth (2006), Small Schools and Urban Youth: Using the Power of School Culture to Engage Youth (2008), and StreetSmart SchoolSmart: Urban Poverty and the Education of Boys of Color (forthcoming). Conchas obtained a Ph.D. and M.A. in Sociology from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor and a B.A. in Sociology from the University of California, Berkeley.

  Dr. Claudia Rodriguez-Mojica, Santa Clara University     Breakout Session Topic: “I didn’t Want to Believe it Was a Race Issue”: Sustaining Teachers and Students of Color    Claudia Rodriguez-Mojica earned her bachelor's degree from UC Davis and a Teaching Credential from CSU Sacramento with a bilingual authorization. She attended Stanford University where she earned a Master's in Linguistics and a Ph.D. in Curriculum Studies and Teacher Education. Dr. Rodriguez-Mojica’s research focuses on instructional scaffolds to support English learners’ access and engagement with academic content and bilingual teachers' entry into bilingual education.  Dr. Rodriguez-Mojica was a dual language elementary school teacher and is currently an Assistant Professor at Santa Clara University. She coordinates the SEMILLA Fellowship program and teaches courses on second language acquisition, literacy and bilingual methods.

Dr. Claudia Rodriguez-Mojica, Santa Clara University

Breakout Session Topic: “I didn’t Want to Believe it Was a Race Issue”: Sustaining Teachers and Students of Color

Claudia Rodriguez-Mojica earned her bachelor's degree from UC Davis and a Teaching Credential from CSU Sacramento with a bilingual authorization. She attended Stanford University where she earned a Master's in Linguistics and a Ph.D. in Curriculum Studies and Teacher Education. Dr. Rodriguez-Mojica’s research focuses on instructional scaffolds to support English learners’ access and engagement with academic content and bilingual teachers' entry into bilingual education.

Dr. Rodriguez-Mojica was a dual language elementary school teacher and is currently an Assistant Professor at Santa Clara University. She coordinates the SEMILLA Fellowship program and teaches courses on second language acquisition, literacy and bilingual methods.

  Reyes Quezada,   EdD, University of San Diego      Breakout Session Topic: Culturally Proficient Practice-Educators Supporting English Learning Student s   Reyes Quezada, Ed.D., writes and teaches in the areas of Bilingual Education, K-12 Teacher Recruitment, Issues on Faculty of Color, Instructional Models, Home-School Community Partnerships, Experiential Education and Physical Education Through Adventure Based Programs. He came to the University of San Diego in 1999 from the University of Redlands and prior to that he taught at California State University, Stanislaus. He has also lectured for California State University San Bernardino, San Diego State University and the Washington Center for Academic Seminars in Washington D.C. Among his articles are "K-12 Teacher Recruitment: Implications for Teacher Education" (Teacher Education Quarterly), "Developing Diverse Faculty in Culturally Proficient Education Programs" (Journal of Multicultural Education), and "Forming Home-School Community Partnerships Among Bilingual Communities" (The School Community Journal).

Reyes Quezada, EdD, University of San Diego

Breakout Session Topic: Culturally Proficient Practice-Educators Supporting English Learning Students

Reyes Quezada, Ed.D., writes and teaches in the areas of Bilingual Education, K-12 Teacher Recruitment, Issues on Faculty of Color, Instructional Models, Home-School Community Partnerships, Experiential Education and Physical Education Through Adventure Based Programs. He came to the University of San Diego in 1999 from the University of Redlands and prior to that he taught at California State University, Stanislaus. He has also lectured for California State University San Bernardino, San Diego State University and the Washington Center for Academic Seminars in Washington D.C. Among his articles are "K-12 Teacher Recruitment: Implications for Teacher Education" (Teacher Education Quarterly), "Developing Diverse Faculty in Culturally Proficient Education Programs" (Journal of Multicultural Education), and "Forming Home-School Community Partnerships Among Bilingual Communities" (The School Community Journal).

  Roland Montemayor  , San Jose City College     Building a College-Bound Culture in Our Community’s High Schools    Roland Montemayor has more than 26-year experience in higher education.  He’s had multiple roles and responsibilities and is currently serving as the acting Vice President of Academic Affairs and Student Affairs at San Jose City College. He is passionate about providing opportunities for all students to increase their social mobility. He greatly values this aspect of his role – the opportunity to remove barriers and help young people achieve their educational and life goals. He enjoys challenging students and watching them grow to their full potential. He encourages faculty to give their students a rigorous, creative curriculum that will prepare them for excellence in the workplace. Together, we are making a difference.

Roland Montemayor, San Jose City College

Building a College-Bound Culture in Our Community’s High Schools

Roland Montemayor has more than 26-year experience in higher education.  He’s had multiple roles and responsibilities and is currently serving as the acting Vice President of Academic Affairs and Student Affairs at San Jose City College. He is passionate about providing opportunities for all students to increase their social mobility. He greatly values this aspect of his role – the opportunity to remove barriers and help young people achieve their educational and life goals. He enjoys challenging students and watching them grow to their full potential. He encourages faculty to give their students a rigorous, creative curriculum that will prepare them for excellence in the workplace. Together, we are making a difference.

  Dr. Kathleen Jablon Stoehr, Santa Clara University     Breakout Session Topic: From Home to School: Creating Meaningful Mathematical Dialogue that Matters    Kathleen Jablon Stoehr is a native Californian who earned her Bachelor’s Degree from San Diego State University in Psychology and her Teaching Credential from Dominican University of California. After teaching elementary and middle school for ten years in California, Texas, Australia and Chile, she earned her Ph.D. in Teaching and Teacher Education in Mathematics Education from the University of Arizona in May 2014. Her teaching philosophy is to equip preservice teachers to embrace the cultural and linguistic differences of today’s classrooms as well as issues of equity and social justice. In addition, her teaching focuses on leveraging students’ home and community-based knowledge and experiences to support student learning.  Kathleen’s research interests are on a variety of issues that relate to preservice and early career teachers’ processes and understandings of learning to teach. Through the use of narrative inquiry, she has explored equity and social justice issues of language, race, culture, and gender that occur in the classroom. Her primary research involves comprehensive and detailed studies of the experiences of mathematics anxiety that some women elementary preservice teachers encounter.

Dr. Kathleen Jablon Stoehr, Santa Clara University

Breakout Session Topic: From Home to School: Creating Meaningful Mathematical Dialogue that Matters

Kathleen Jablon Stoehr is a native Californian who earned her Bachelor’s Degree from San Diego State University in Psychology and her Teaching Credential from Dominican University of California. After teaching elementary and middle school for ten years in California, Texas, Australia and Chile, she earned her Ph.D. in Teaching and Teacher Education in Mathematics Education from the University of Arizona in May 2014. Her teaching philosophy is to equip preservice teachers to embrace the cultural and linguistic differences of today’s classrooms as well as issues of equity and social justice. In addition, her teaching focuses on leveraging students’ home and community-based knowledge and experiences to support student learning.

Kathleen’s research interests are on a variety of issues that relate to preservice and early career teachers’ processes and understandings of learning to teach. Through the use of narrative inquiry, she has explored equity and social justice issues of language, race, culture, and gender that occur in the classroom. Her primary research involves comprehensive and detailed studies of the experiences of mathematics anxiety that some women elementary preservice teachers encounter.

  Maria Madrigal,   Voices Mount Pleasant     Breakout Session Topic:   From Home to School: Creating Meaningful Mathematical Dialogue that Matters    Providing the opportunity to students to learn in both Spanish and English is something that every child should have the opportunity to do. Often times society does not place value in the Latino culture and students grow up feeling ashamed of their roots instead of seeing this as an asset. I feel that as a first generation college graduate it is my duty to give back to my community. To be a model to students and to let them know that it is possible and they can attain whatever they set their mind to. Life will bring struggles, but a Si se puede attitude is necessary to achieve greatness!  I am currently the principal of Voices Mount Pleasant. A dual immersion school located in the eastside of San Jose. At Voices we value language and know that a student not only has to have high academic expectations but also need to build a  strong character. This is done through our school values; si se puede attitude, In Lak'ech, Escolaridad, and Activismo.

Maria Madrigal, Voices Mount Pleasant

Breakout Session Topic: From Home to School: Creating Meaningful Mathematical Dialogue that Matters

Providing the opportunity to students to learn in both Spanish and English is something that every child should have the opportunity to do. Often times society does not place value in the Latino culture and students grow up feeling ashamed of their roots instead of seeing this as an asset. I feel that as a first generation college graduate it is my duty to give back to my community. To be a model to students and to let them know that it is possible and they can attain whatever they set their mind to. Life will bring struggles, but a Si se puede attitude is necessary to achieve greatness!

I am currently the principal of Voices Mount Pleasant. A dual immersion school located in the eastside of San Jose. At Voices we value language and know that a student not only has to have high academic expectations but also need to build a  strong character. This is done through our school values; si se puede attitude, In Lak'ech, Escolaridad, and Activismo.

  Jorge L. Escobar, San Jose-Evergreen Community College Dist.     Breakout Session: Re-imaging the Community College Ecosystem (K-14)    As member of the Presidential cabinet, his portfolio includes multiple strategic areas: Milpitas College Extension, management of $320+ million for bond construction projects; facilities development and operations; fiscal and business services; campus technology; and overall operational performance of the institution – his primary focus is ensuring the overall college ecosystem works to support student success.  Jorge has received numerous awards and commendations including a Special Recognition Award from Princeton University (2011); the Donald Griffin ’23 Management Award, Princeton University (2010); Special Achievement Award, Merrill Lynch (1997); Distinguished Administrator, San José City College (2017); and recently Top 100 most influential and notable Hispanic Professionals in Information Technology – HITEC (2017)

Jorge L. Escobar, San Jose-Evergreen Community College Dist.

Breakout Session: Re-imaging the Community College Ecosystem (K-14)

As member of the Presidential cabinet, his portfolio includes multiple strategic areas: Milpitas College Extension, management of $320+ million for bond construction projects; facilities development and operations; fiscal and business services; campus technology; and overall operational performance of the institution – his primary focus is ensuring the overall college ecosystem works to support student success.

Jorge has received numerous awards and commendations including a Special Recognition Award from Princeton University (2011); the Donald Griffin ’23 Management Award, Princeton University (2010); Special Achievement Award, Merrill Lynch (1997); Distinguished Administrator, San José City College (2017); and recently Top 100 most influential and notable Hispanic Professionals in Information Technology – HITEC (2017)

  Patrick Sanchez, Newark Unified School District     Breakout Session Topic: Leveraging Latina/o Cultural Assets for Student Success    Pat Sánchez was selected as Superintendent at Newark Unified School District in 2016, bringing with him over 20 years of comprehensive administrative experience and a proven track record of transforming four inner city schools and one inner city school district through collaborative leadership and community engagement.  Most recently, he was named Latino Superintendent of the Year by the Association of Latino Administrators and Superintendents (ALAS) in 2015. Former President Obama recognized him as a Champion of Change – which included an invitation to the White House to share ideas and insights. Former U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan applauded Superintendent Sánchez with national recognition for his collaborative work, and encouraged replication of his model of supporting parental involvement and engendering community support across the country.  Originally from San Luis, Colorado, he is the youngest of seven children and the first person in his family to graduate from high school, college, and to receive a graduate degree. He earned a Bachelor of Arts in secondary industrial science and a general education license from Colorado State University. He obtained a vocational instructor license in trades and industry. Superintendent Sánchez completed his Master of Arts in administration, supervision and curriculum development at the University of Colorado at Denver, and went on to obtain his professional principal license

Patrick Sanchez, Newark Unified School District

Breakout Session Topic: Leveraging Latina/o Cultural Assets for Student Success

Pat Sánchez was selected as Superintendent at Newark Unified School District in 2016, bringing with him over 20 years of comprehensive administrative experience and a proven track record of transforming four inner city schools and one inner city school district through collaborative leadership and community engagement.

Most recently, he was named Latino Superintendent of the Year by the Association of Latino Administrators and Superintendents (ALAS) in 2015. Former President Obama recognized him as a Champion of Change – which included an invitation to the White House to share ideas and insights. Former U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan applauded Superintendent Sánchez with national recognition for his collaborative work, and encouraged replication of his model of supporting parental involvement and engendering community support across the country.

Originally from San Luis, Colorado, he is the youngest of seven children and the first person in his family to graduate from high school, college, and to receive a graduate degree. He earned a Bachelor of Arts in secondary industrial science and a general education license from Colorado State University. He obtained a vocational instructor license in trades and industry. Superintendent Sánchez completed his Master of Arts in administration, supervision and curriculum development at the University of Colorado at Denver, and went on to obtain his professional principal license

  Felix W. Ortiz III, Viridis Learning      Breakout Session:       Re-imaging the Community College Ecosystem (K-14 )    Felix W. Ortiz III is the founder, chairman, and CEO of Viridis Learning, a cloud-based, SaaS technology platform that integrates with existing student information systems, government databases and labor market information to connect students to employers.  Through his work he drives change by mobilizing the middle-skill workforce and leveling the employment playing field for young people and underserved communities.  With a distinct veteran and entrepreneurial perspective, Felix understands the difficulties that many people face as they enter today’s employment market. Lacking the right skills and resources, he founded Viridis Learning when he discovered gaps in the system that provided a disadvantage to many. Through the creation of the Skills Passport™, the data-driven employment ledger retains lifetime access of students’ verified knowledge, skills and ability, creating an evolved pathway to relevant career opportunities.

Felix W. Ortiz III, Viridis Learning

Breakout Session:  Re-imaging the Community College Ecosystem (K-14)

Felix W. Ortiz III is the founder, chairman, and CEO of Viridis Learning, a cloud-based, SaaS technology platform that integrates with existing student information systems, government databases and labor market information to connect students to employers.  Through his work he drives change by mobilizing the middle-skill workforce and leveling the employment playing field for young people and underserved communities.  With a distinct veteran and entrepreneurial perspective, Felix understands the difficulties that many people face as they enter today’s employment market. Lacking the right skills and resources, he founded Viridis Learning when he discovered gaps in the system that provided a disadvantage to many. Through the creation of the Skills Passport™, the data-driven employment ledger retains lifetime access of students’ verified knowledge, skills and ability, creating an evolved pathway to relevant career opportunities.

  Dr. Edwardo Mosqueda, University of California - Santa Cruz     Breakout Session Topic:     The Role of School Leadership in English Language Learner College Readiness    Eduardo Mosqueda is an Assistant Professor of Education at UC Santa Cruz. He completed his doctoral studies at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. His research analyses the relationship between the English proficiency of Language Minority students, their access to rigorous courses and their performance on standardized mathematics assessments. He has authored or co-authored articles in the Journal of Urban Mathematics Education, Equity and Excellence in Education, and Review of Research in Education.

Dr. Edwardo Mosqueda, University of California - Santa Cruz

Breakout Session Topic: The Role of School Leadership in English Language Learner College Readiness

Eduardo Mosqueda is an Assistant Professor of Education at UC Santa Cruz. He completed his doctoral studies at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. His research analyses the relationship between the English proficiency of Language Minority students, their access to rigorous courses and their performance on standardized mathematics assessments. He has authored or co-authored articles in the Journal of Urban Mathematics Education, Equity and Excellence in Education, and Review of Research in Education.

  Dr. Pedro Hernández-Ramos, Santa Clara University     Breakout Session Topic: Practical Technology Tools to Support Language Development and Learning    Born in New Orleans, LA, Pedro grew up in Mexico where he received a BA from Universidad Iberoamericana (a Jesuit institution) in Mexico City. He then went on to earn a Ph.D. in Mass Communication Research at Stanford University. His first job after the doctorate was as an Assistant Editor for the International Encyclopedia of Communications, a joint project of the Annenberg School for Communications of the University of Pennsylvania and Oxford University Press.  Back in California, he spent two years working as a consultant on usability research for high tech companies including Microsoft and Sun Microsystems. In 1991 he joined Apple Computer as the Education Manager for Latin America & Caribbean, then served as Education Business Development Manager for Apple Pacific, and finally as the Research Manager for the Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow (ACOT) program. His research interests are in teacher's technology integration and pedagogical applications of games and simulations.

Dr. Pedro Hernández-Ramos, Santa Clara University

Breakout Session Topic: Practical Technology Tools to Support Language Development and Learning

Born in New Orleans, LA, Pedro grew up in Mexico where he received a BA from Universidad Iberoamericana (a Jesuit institution) in Mexico City. He then went on to earn a Ph.D. in Mass Communication Research at Stanford University. His first job after the doctorate was as an Assistant Editor for the International Encyclopedia of Communications, a joint project of the Annenberg School for Communications of the University of Pennsylvania and Oxford University Press.

Back in California, he spent two years working as a consultant on usability research for high tech companies including Microsoft and Sun Microsystems. In 1991 he joined Apple Computer as the Education Manager for Latin America & Caribbean, then served as Education Business Development Manager for Apple Pacific, and finally as the Research Manager for the Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow (ACOT) program. His research interests are in teacher's technology integration and pedagogical applications of games and simulations.

  Dr. Jonathan Rosa,   Stanford University     Breakout Session Topic:     Community as a Campus: From Language “Problems” to Possibilities in Latino Communitie s   Jonathan Rosa is Assistant Professor in the Graduate School of Education, Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity, and, by courtesy, Departments of Anthropology and Linguistics at Stanford University. His research combines sociocultural and linguistic anthropology to study the co-naturalization of language and race as a key feature of modern governance. Specifically, he analyzes the interplay between racial marginalization, linguistic stigmatization, and educational inequity. Dr. Rosa is author of the forthcoming book, Looking like a Language, Sounding like a Race: Raciolinguistic Ideologies and the Learning of Latinidad. In addition to his formal scholarly research, Dr. Rosa is an ongoing participant in public intellectual projects focused on race, education, language, youth, (im)migration, and U.S. Latinxs. His work has appeared in scholarly journals such as the Harvard Educational Review, American Ethnologist, American Anthropologist, and the Journal of Linguistic Anthropology, as well as media outlets such as MSNBC, NPR, CNN, and Univision.

Dr. Jonathan Rosa, Stanford University

Breakout Session Topic: Community as a Campus: From Language “Problems” to Possibilities in Latino Communities

Jonathan Rosa is Assistant Professor in the Graduate School of Education, Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity, and, by courtesy, Departments of Anthropology and Linguistics at Stanford University. His research combines sociocultural and linguistic anthropology to study the co-naturalization of language and race as a key feature of modern governance. Specifically, he analyzes the interplay between racial marginalization, linguistic stigmatization, and educational inequity. Dr. Rosa is author of the forthcoming book, Looking like a Language, Sounding like a Race: Raciolinguistic Ideologies and the Learning of Latinidad. In addition to his formal scholarly research, Dr. Rosa is an ongoing participant in public intellectual projects focused on race, education, language, youth, (im)migration, and U.S. Latinxs. His work has appeared in scholarly journals such as the Harvard Educational Review, American Ethnologist, American Anthropologist, and the Journal of Linguistic Anthropology, as well as media outlets such as MSNBC, NPR, CNN, and Univision.

  Dr. Oscar Jimenez-Castellanos, Arizona State University     Breakout Session Topic:   Transforming Bicultural Family Engagement Towards Empowerment and Advocacy    Oscar Jimenez-Castellanos is an associate professor in education policy and evaluation in Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College at Arizona State University. He is a 2016-17 Visiting Scholar at UC Berkeley, Graduate School of Education with a courtesy affiliation with Policy Analysis for California Education (PACE). Jimenez-Castellanos has published extensively in the areas of K-12 education finance, policy and parent engagement and its impact on opportunity, equity and outcomes in low-income ethnically and linguistically diverse communities. He recently completed a study on the intersection of language, poverty, ethnicity and policy in press in Review of Research in Education (RRE). Jimenez-Castellanos additionally completed a longitudinal statewide analysis in Texas focusing on secondary ELLs and school expenditures and a longitudinal statewide study in Arizona examining district revenue equity across districts. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Review of Educational Research, Journal of Education Finance, Bilingual Research Journal, Teachers College Record, and Journal of Latinos and Education. Jimenez-Castellanos co-edited Bicultural Parent Engagement: Empowerment and Advocacy (2011) published by Teachers College Press. This book received a 2012 AESA Critics Choice Award. He is currently working on a historical legislative analysis to understand the trajectory of school funding for English language learners in California.

Dr. Oscar Jimenez-Castellanos, Arizona State University

Breakout Session Topic: Transforming Bicultural Family Engagement Towards Empowerment and Advocacy

Oscar Jimenez-Castellanos is an associate professor in education policy and evaluation in Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College at Arizona State University. He is a 2016-17 Visiting Scholar at UC Berkeley, Graduate School of Education with a courtesy affiliation with Policy Analysis for California Education (PACE). Jimenez-Castellanos has published extensively in the areas of K-12 education finance, policy and parent engagement and its impact on opportunity, equity and outcomes in low-income ethnically and linguistically diverse communities. He recently completed a study on the intersection of language, poverty, ethnicity and policy in press in Review of Research in Education (RRE). Jimenez-Castellanos additionally completed a longitudinal statewide analysis in Texas focusing on secondary ELLs and school expenditures and a longitudinal statewide study in Arizona examining district revenue equity across districts. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Review of Educational Research, Journal of Education Finance, Bilingual Research Journal, Teachers College Record, and Journal of Latinos and Education. Jimenez-Castellanos co-edited Bicultural Parent Engagement: Empowerment and Advocacy (2011) published by Teachers College Press. This book received a 2012 AESA Critics Choice Award. He is currently working on a historical legislative analysis to understand the trajectory of school funding for English language learners in California.

  Dr. Byron Breland, San Jose City College     Breakout Session:     California Community Colleges: The Latinx Giant in Higher Education/The Role of Latinx Leaders to Influence Change    Dr. Breland has held administrative positions at the University of Maryland at College Park and the University of Southern California where he successfully led community development, outreach, and student success initiatives. Dr. Clift Breland has served as an Assistant Dean and Director of Judicial Affairs at the University of California, Irvine. He also held the posts of Associate Dean of Student Development at Santa Ana College and Dean of Student Affairs at Long Beach City College 

Dr. Byron Breland, San Jose City College

Breakout Session: California Community Colleges: The Latinx Giant in Higher Education/The Role of Latinx Leaders to Influence Change

Dr. Breland has held administrative positions at the University of Maryland at College Park and the University of Southern California where he successfully led community development, outreach, and student success initiatives. Dr. Clift Breland has served as an Assistant Dean and Director of Judicial Affairs at the University of California, Irvine. He also held the posts of Associate Dean of Student Development at Santa Ana College and Dean of Student Affairs at Long Beach City College 

  Dr. Fabio R. Gonzalez, San Jose City College     Breakout Session:     California Community Colleges: The Latinx Giant in Higher Education/The Role of Latinx Leaders to Influence Change

Dr. Fabio R. Gonzalez, San Jose City College

Breakout Session: California Community Colleges: The Latinx Giant in Higher Education/The Role of Latinx Leaders to Influence Change

  Corinna Ott, Santa Clara University      Breakout Session Topic: “I didn’t want to believe it was a race issue” : Sustaining Teachers and Students of Color     Corinna Ott is presently working towards her Master of Arts in Teaching and Single Subject Social Science Credential at Santa Clara University. She discovered her love of teaching by working with others in traditional and non-traditional classrooms around the world. She taught 5th grade at an elementary school in Gilroy during the 2016-2017 school year and is presently student teaching U.S. History and Sociology of Marriage, Sex, and Family at Ann Sobrato High School in Morgan Hill. Corinna is passionate about social justice and incorporating the stories of the marginalized into her classroom curriculum. After she graduates this June, she will be teaching at Menlo-Atherton High School in Atherton, California

Corinna Ott, Santa Clara University 

Breakout Session Topic: “I didn’t want to believe it was a race issue” : Sustaining Teachers and Students of Color

Corinna Ott is presently working towards her Master of Arts in Teaching and Single Subject Social Science Credential at Santa Clara University. She discovered her love of teaching by working with others in traditional and non-traditional classrooms around the world. She taught 5th grade at an elementary school in Gilroy during the 2016-2017 school year and is presently student teaching U.S. History and Sociology of Marriage, Sex, and Family at Ann Sobrato High School in Morgan Hill. Corinna is passionate about social justice and incorporating the stories of the marginalized into her classroom curriculum. After she graduates this June, she will be teaching at Menlo-Atherton High School in Atherton, California

  Keith Yocam, EdD, Santa Clara University      Breakout Session Topic: Practical Technology Tools to Support Language Development and Learning    Since 2004 Keith Yocam has been teaching education courses in the Department of Education at Santa Clara University. He also works with the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at SCU designing and facilitating the Center’s Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs).  Keith was Senior Scientist and Worldwide Program Manager for the Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow (ACOT) program at Apple Computers, Inc. ACOT investigated the organizational, pedagogical and technical impact of student and teacher access to technology in classrooms. For ten years he served on the Board of Directors of World Links, an innovative and independent not-for-profit enterprise, which leveraged the potential of technology to bring opportunity and hope to disadvantaged youth around the world.  Keith received a B.A. and Multiple Subject Teaching Credential from California State University, Fullerton. He received a M.A. in Interdisciplinary Education with an emphasis in Learning with Technology from Santa Clara University. He has 11 years of teaching experience as an elementary school teacher, science resource specialist, and district computer mentor teacher

Keith Yocam, EdD, Santa Clara University

Breakout Session Topic: Practical Technology Tools to Support Language Development and Learning

Since 2004 Keith Yocam has been teaching education courses in the Department of Education at Santa Clara University. He also works with the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at SCU designing and facilitating the Center’s Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs).

Keith was Senior Scientist and Worldwide Program Manager for the Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow (ACOT) program at Apple Computers, Inc. ACOT investigated the organizational, pedagogical and technical impact of student and teacher access to technology in classrooms. For ten years he served on the Board of Directors of World Links, an innovative and independent not-for-profit enterprise, which leveraged the potential of technology to bring opportunity and hope to disadvantaged youth around the world.

Keith received a B.A. and Multiple Subject Teaching Credential from California State University, Fullerton. He received a M.A. in Interdisciplinary Education with an emphasis in Learning with Technology from Santa Clara University. He has 11 years of teaching experience as an elementary school teacher, science resource specialist, and district computer mentor teacher

  Dr. Sherry Segura, The Foundation for Hispanic Education      Breakout Session Topic:     The Role of School Leadership in English Language Learner College Readiness    Dr. Sherry Segura has more than 20 years of education experience. She served as a middle school language arts, ELD, and reading intervention teacher.  She spent 6 years as an instructional coach, supporting teachers in growing and developing in their craft.  She was a successful early childhood, elementary and K-8 school principal in Colorado and California.  She earned a Master of Education from the University of Houston and a Doctor of Philosophy in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Denver.  Dr. Segura was an adjunct professor in the Morgridge College of Education at the University of Denver.  She is currently the Chief Academic Officer at The Foundation for Hispanic Education in San Jose, CA.

Dr. Sherry Segura, The Foundation for Hispanic Education

Breakout Session Topic: The Role of School Leadership in English Language Learner College Readiness

Dr. Sherry Segura has more than 20 years of education experience. She served as a middle school language arts, ELD, and reading intervention teacher.  She spent 6 years as an instructional coach, supporting teachers in growing and developing in their craft.  She was a successful early childhood, elementary and K-8 school principal in Colorado and California.  She earned a Master of Education from the University of Houston and a Doctor of Philosophy in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Denver.  Dr. Segura was an adjunct professor in the Morgridge College of Education at the University of Denver.  She is currently the Chief Academic Officer at The Foundation for Hispanic Education in San Jose, CA.

  Dr. Tomás Galguera, Mills College     Breakout Session Topic: Participant Structures as Culturally Informed Scaffolds for Classroom Participation    Professor Tomás Galguera teaches language development methods and research methods courses in the Mills College School of Education in Oakland, California, where he has taught since 1996. He obtained his PhD in Education with an emphasis in Language Literacy and Culture from Stanford University. He provides professional development to teachers, schools, and districts on language development and classroom inquiry. Professor Galguera’s publications and research interests include pedagogy of teacher preparation for language development, teacher classroom research, documentation of teaching practice, and the role of information technology and social media on teaching and teacher education. His most recent research focuses on the development of pedagogical language knowledge among beginning teachers. Before Mills College, Professor Galguera was a Spanish bilingual teacher in the Oakland Unified School District .

Dr. Tomás Galguera, Mills College

Breakout Session Topic: Participant Structures as Culturally Informed Scaffolds for Classroom Participation

Professor Tomás Galguera teaches language development methods and research methods courses in the Mills College School of Education in Oakland, California, where he has taught since 1996. He obtained his PhD in Education with an emphasis in Language Literacy and Culture from Stanford University. He provides professional development to teachers, schools, and districts on language development and classroom inquiry. Professor Galguera’s publications and research interests include pedagogy of teacher preparation for language development, teacher classroom research, documentation of teaching practice, and the role of information technology and social media on teaching and teacher education. His most recent research focuses on the development of pedagogical language knowledge among beginning teachers. Before Mills College, Professor Galguera was a Spanish bilingual teacher in the Oakland Unified School District.

  Jesus Covarrubias, San Jose City College     Breakout Session:     California Community Colleges: The Latinx Giant in Higher Education/The Role of Latinx Leaders to Influence Change

Jesus Covarrubias, San Jose City College

Breakout Session: California Community Colleges: The Latinx Giant in Higher Education/The Role of Latinx Leaders to Influence Change

  Dr. Sandra Jewett, The Foundation for Hispanic Education     Breakout Session Topic:     The Role of School Leadership in English Language Learner College Readiness    Dr. Sandra Jewett is Chief of Human Resources and Compliance at The Foundation for Hispanic Education in San Jose, CA. Dr. Sandra Jewett is an accomplished and successful senior executive and educator. She has dedicated her entire career to improve and provide educational equity and equal access to K-20 students both in the United States and abroad.  Dr. Jewett possesses both teaching and administrative credentials; she holds multiple post-graduate degrees in education, organizational leadership and theology, the latter two from the University of San Francisco. Her doctoral expertise is on mentoring and coaching school leaders and she is also certified on coaching C-level executives. Sandra served as classroom teacher, dean, principal, director, assistant superintendent, chief academic officer, vice president for educational services and adjunct faculty in the College of Education.

Dr. Sandra Jewett, The Foundation for Hispanic Education

Breakout Session Topic: The Role of School Leadership in English Language Learner College Readiness

Dr. Sandra Jewett is Chief of Human Resources and Compliance at The Foundation for Hispanic Education in San Jose, CA. Dr. Sandra Jewett is an accomplished and successful senior executive and educator. She has dedicated her entire career to improve and provide educational equity and equal access to K-20 students both in the United States and abroad.

Dr. Jewett possesses both teaching and administrative credentials; she holds multiple post-graduate degrees in education, organizational leadership and theology, the latter two from the University of San Francisco. Her doctoral expertise is on mentoring and coaching school leaders and she is also certified on coaching C-level executives. Sandra served as classroom teacher, dean, principal, director, assistant superintendent, chief academic officer, vice president for educational services and adjunct faculty in the College of Education.

Breakout Sessions in Detail

Session Room: Kenna Hall 102
Title:
 Cracks in the Schoolyard—Confronting Latino Educational Inequality
Presenter: Dr. Gilberto Q. Conchas
Institution: UC Irvine
Abstract: In Cracks in the Schoolyard, I challenge deficit models of schooling and turn school failure on its head. Going beyond presenting critical case studies of social inequality and education, this talk features achievement cases that depict Latinos as active actors -- not hopeless victims -- in the quest for social and economic mobility. I examine the ways in which college students, high school youth, English language learners, immigrant Latino parents, queer homeless youth, the children of Mexican undocumented immigrants, and undocumented immigrant youth all work in local settings to improve their quality of life and advocate for their families and communities. Taken together, these counternarratives will help educators and policymakers fill the cracks in the schoolyard that often create disparity and failure for youth and young adults.
Target Audience: Elementary school teachers, Secondary school teachers, School leaders.

Session Room: Kenna Hall 104
Title: Culturally Proficient Practice-Educators Supporting English Learning Students
Presenter: Dr. Reyes L. Quezada
Institution: University of San Diego
Abstract: This session will focus on how to reach cultural proficiency in practice and policies in order to close the academic achievement and social gaps that exist among English learning students and English speaking peers. The Educators’ Rubric for Support of English Learning Students and Their Communities will be introduced as a tool to improve educators’ professional practice that promote academic and social well-being of English learning students.  Participants will experience components of the rubric based on the five essential elements and identify key cultural proficiency principles that can support instructional and support programs for English Learning students and their families.

Session Room: Kenna Hall 105
Title:
“I didn’t want to believe it was a race issue”: Sustaining Teachers and Students of Color
Presenter: Dr. Claudia Rodriguez-Mojica & Corinna Ott (Graduate Student)
Institution: Santa Clara University
Abstract: Many schools and teacher education programs actively recruit bilingual teachers and teachers of color in an effort to create a teacher workforce more reflective of the local student population. Diversifying the teacher workforce, however, must involve more than recruiting teachers of color; it must involve efforts to sustain teachers of color. In this session, we will discuss the unique experiences of teachers of color and move from talking about difficult and uncomfortable issues to practiced problem solving. In this way, we will be better prepared to act when faced with injustices in education.

Session Room: Kenna Hall 212
Title: Practical Technology Tools to Support Language Development and Learning
Presenters: Dr. Pedro Hernández-Ramos & Keith Yocam, M.A.
Institutions: Santa Clara University
Abstract: In this session, participants will learn the basics about software tools that help teachers and students visualize learning and use built-in features in the Mac and PC operating systems for dictation and text-to-speech functions to support language learning and development.

Session Room: Kenna Hall 111
Title: From Home to School: Creating Meaningful Mathematical Dialogue that Matters
Presenter: Dr. Kathy Jablon Stoehr & Maria Madrigal
Institutions: Santa Clara University & Voices College-Bound Language Academy
Abstract: This session focuses on a model of parental and teacher engagement in mathematics based on a two-way dialogue between school and home. It draws on over two decades of development and research in mathematics education with Latinx families. In this presentation, a mathematics teacher educator, a school principal, teachers and parents describe and share activities and learning experiences from an elementary dual language school that focuses on how to support teachers and parents to learn from each other, how to engage parents with school mathematics; and how to implement professional development to support student learning.

Session Room: Kenna Hall 214
Title: Participant Structures as Culturally Informed Scaffolds for Classroom Participation
Presenter: Dr. Tomás Galguera
Institutions: Mills College
Abstract: Group work is considered good pedagogy, especially for language development. But is all group work good? In this session we will discuss participant structures as a way to think about collaborative work with Latinx students. We will examine how communicative tasks with information gaps are essential components of participant structures. We will consider how participant structures help students notice how they use language and think through a task. Finally, we will look at ways that participant structures tap into cultural assets students bring with them. The hands-on workshop will include opportunities to ask questions and discuss ideas.

Session Room: Kenna Hall 306
Title: Transforming Bicultural Family Engagement Towards Empowerment and Advocacy
Presenter: Dr. Oscar Jiménez-Castellanos
Institutions: Arizona State University
Abstract: This seminar/workshop will focus on the challenges and possibilities in transforming school-family bicultural engagement that promotes parent and student advocacy and empowerment. Participants will gain a deeper understanding of the theoretical framework and how this applies to engaging stakeholders as part of the Local Control Accountability Plan. This session is grounded on the presenter's co-edited book Bicultural Parent Engagement: Empowerment and Advocacy published by Teachers College Press. This book received an AESA Critics Choice Award.

Session Room: Kenna Hall 218
Title: The Role of School Leadership in English Language Learner College Readiness
Presenter: Dr. Eduardo Mosqueda, Dr. Sandra Jewett & Dr. Sherry Segura
Institutions: University of California - Santa Cruz & The Foundation for Hispanic Education
Abstract: The Implementation of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) have resulted in shifts in educational policy that have intensified instructional demands and the knowledge and skills students are expected to learn in school. The CCSS’s increased expectations for teaching and learning include rigorous content knowledge as well as literacy skills. The increased language demands will likely have disproportionate effects on the achievement of students that have persistently underachieved in mathematics—English Language Learners, particularly in secondary schools. The intensification of content and language demands requires careful consideration of school leadership roles, the integration of English Learner instructional support, as well as improving access to higher level mathematics courses. This presentation will highlight the school restructuring process at a high school that is aligning its curriculum and course offerings to meet the college readiness goals of the CCSS in math, paying particular attention to administrative and teacher leadership roles, EL instructional support practices, assessment, and implementing rigorous curriculum while simultaneously aligning course-taking offering to maximize the number of students taking precalculus and calculus at the end of 12th grade.

Session Room: Kenna Hall 310
Title: Building a College-Bound Culture in Our Community’s High Schools
Presenter: Roland Montemayor & Beverly Stewart
Institution: San Jose City College
Abstract: Starting in Fall Semester 2017, SJCC enrolled more than 1,300 area high school students in a variety of dual-enrollment courses. Dual-enrollment courses are actual SJCC courses, taught in area high schools during the schools’ instructional days. Traditionally, these courses were provided for high achieving students. SJCC has made a purposeful effort to include Latino students and student who receive free and reduced lunches at the high school in dual enrollment. These courses provide a vital service by opening pathways for high school students to understand the requirements for and qualify for acceptance at SJCC.

Session Room: O'Connor Hall 104
Title:
 Re-imaging the Community College Ecosystem
Presenter: Jorge L. Escobar & Felix W. Ortiz III
Institutions: San Jose City College; Virdis Learning
Abstract: Community Colleges are complex ecosystems aiming to ensure student success as part of the education continuum from K-12.  This session will describe how important is the integration of different applications to manage engagement with students at scale, automating workflows and communications with students, and using Case Management to keep students on the guided pathway.  This session will also highlight the use of Viridis Learning to connect with sources of data that enables the creation of the Skill Passport, and how SJCC plans to use that to enable the counselor to help the student pick a guided pathway, and plan their path to a well-paying job. 

Session Room: O'Connor Hall 105
Title: California Community Colleges: The Latinx Giant in Higher Education & The Role of Latinx Leaders to Influence Change
Presenter: Dr. Byron Breland, Jesus Covarrubias & Dr. Fabio R. Gonzalez
Institution: San Jose City College
Abstract: Understanding the California Community College shared governance model is key to the decision-making process on how Latinx at all level can play a role.  Influencing a shift in a college culture and strengthening Latinx students' identity starts with active participation at all levels of the decision-making process.  This roundtable composed of college leaders from San Jose City College will emphasize the practices and synergies needed to influence change.  

Session Room: Kenna Hall 216
Title: Community as a Campus: From Language “Problems” to Possibilities in Latino Communities
Presenter: Dr. Jonathan Rosa
Institution: Stanford University
Abstract: This presentation points to exciting possibilities that emerge when we approach Latino communities not as linguistically deficient, but rather as dynamically multilingual. It analyzes a collaborative project bringing together a professor and undergraduate students with a teacher and students in a predominantly Latino high school to document and analyze language use in a Latino community where linguistic diversity is too often viewed as a handicap rather than a skill. By approaching this community as a campus, the students and instructors developed an alternative perspective highlighting not only the vast challenges its residents face, but also their dexterity and ingenuity.