Keynote Speaker: Kris D. Gutiérrez

Kris D. Gutiérrez is the Carol Liu Professor at the Graduate School of Education, University of California, Berkeley. Gutiérrez is a leader in the learning sciences, literacy, educational policy, and qualitative, design-based approaches to inquiry. Gutiérrez is a member of the National Academy of Education and fellow of AERA and the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. She is past president of the American Educational Research Association and was appointed by President Obama to the National Board for the Institute of Education Sciences, for which she served as vice-chair. Gutiérrez’s research examines learning in designed environments, with attention to students from nondominant communities and Dual Language Learners. Her work on Third Spaces examines the affordances of syncretic approaches to literacy and learning, new media literacies, STEM learning, and the re-mediation of functional systems of learning.  Her work in social design experiments seeks to leverage students’ everyday concepts and practices to ratchet up expansive and equitable forms of learning.  Key examples of longstanding collaborations with immigrant and migrant communities include Las Redes, a 15-year long afterschool program that privileged hybrid language practices for youth, grades K-5, El Pueblo Mágico, a STEM-oriented after-school program, and the UCLA Migrant Student Leadership Program for California youth from migrant farmworker backgrounds.

 

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Breakout Session Speakers

Kathy Stoehr, PhD, Santa Clara University Breakout Session: Supporting English Language Learners in the Mathematics Classroom Kathleen Jablon Stoehr earned her Bachelor’s Degree from San Diego State University in Psychology and her Teaching Credential from Dominican University of California. After teaching elementary and middle school for ten years in California, Texas, Australia and Chile, she earned her Ph.D. in Teaching and Teacher Education in Mathematics Education from the University of Arizona in May 2014. Her teaching philosophy is to equip pre-service teachers to embrace the cultural and linguistic differences of today’s classrooms as well as issues of equity and social justice. In addition, her teaching focuses on leveraging students’ home and community-based knowledge and experiences to support student learning. Kathy’s research interests are on a variety of issues that relate to pre-service and early career teachers’ processes and understandings of learning to teach. Through the use of narrative inquiry, she has explored equity and social justice issues of language, race, culture, and gender that occur in the classroom.

Kathy Stoehr, PhD, Santa Clara University

Breakout Session: Supporting English Language Learners in the Mathematics Classroom

Kathleen Jablon Stoehr earned her Bachelor’s Degree from San Diego State University in Psychology and her Teaching Credential from Dominican University of California. After teaching elementary and middle school for ten years in California, Texas, Australia and Chile, she earned her Ph.D. in Teaching and Teacher Education in Mathematics Education from the University of Arizona in May 2014. Her teaching philosophy is to equip pre-service teachers to embrace the cultural and linguistic differences of today’s classrooms as well as issues of equity and social justice. In addition, her teaching focuses on leveraging students’ home and community-based knowledge and experiences to support student learning. Kathy’s research interests are on a variety of issues that relate to pre-service and early career teachers’ processes and understandings of learning to teach. Through the use of narrative inquiry, she has explored equity and social justice issues of language, race, culture, and gender that occur in the classroom.

Eduardo Mosqueda, PhD, University of California, Santa Cruz Breakout Session: Supporting English Language Learners in the Mathematics Classroom Eduardo Mosqueda is an Associate Professor of Education at UC Santa Cruz. He completed his doctoral studies at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. His research analyses the relationship between the English proficiency of Language Minority students, their access to rigorous courses and their performance on standardized mathematics assessments. He has authored or co-authored articles in the Journal of Urban Mathematics Education, Equity and Excellence in Education, and Review of Research in Education.

Eduardo Mosqueda, PhD, University of California, Santa Cruz

Breakout Session: Supporting English Language Learners in the Mathematics Classroom

Eduardo Mosqueda is an Associate Professor of Education at UC Santa Cruz. He completed his doctoral studies at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. His research analyses the relationship between the English proficiency of Language Minority students, their access to rigorous courses and their performance on standardized mathematics assessments. He has authored or co-authored articles in the Journal of Urban Mathematics Education, Equity and Excellence in Education, and Review of Research in Education.

Lorena Llosa, PhD, New York University Breakout Session: Designing NGSS-aligned Lessons for English Learners in Elementary School Lorena Llosa received her bachelor's degree from Santa Clara University. She then completed an M.A. in TESOL and a Ph.D. in Applied Linguistics at the University of California, Los Angeles. She is an Associate Professor of Education in the Department of Teaching and Learning at New York University. Dr. Llosa’s scholarship addresses validity issues related to the uses of assessments to evaluate English learners’ language and academic skills in K-16 contexts. Her studies have focused on standards-based classroom assessments of language proficiency, assessment of academic writing, placement testing of US-educated language minority students in community colleges, and the integration of language and science in instruction and assessment. She recently served as Co-PI of the NSF-funded project “Promoting Science Among English Language Learners (P-SELL) Scale-Up”, which investigated the effectiveness of a professional development and curricular intervention designed to improve the science achievement of all students, especially English learners. She is currently working on another NSF-funded project to develop fifth grade science instructional materials aligned to the Next Generation Science Standards for English learners in California and New Jersey.  

Lorena Llosa, PhD, New York University

Breakout Session: Designing NGSS-aligned Lessons for English Learners in Elementary School

Lorena Llosa received her bachelor's degree from Santa Clara University. She then completed an M.A. in TESOL and a Ph.D. in Applied Linguistics at the University of California, Los Angeles. She is an Associate Professor of Education in the Department of Teaching and Learning at New York University. Dr. Llosa’s scholarship addresses validity issues related to the uses of assessments to evaluate English learners’ language and academic skills in K-16 contexts. Her studies have focused on standards-based classroom assessments of language proficiency, assessment of academic writing, placement testing of US-educated language minority students in community colleges, and the integration of language and science in instruction and assessment. She recently served as Co-PI of the NSF-funded project “Promoting Science Among English Language Learners (P-SELL) Scale-Up”, which investigated the effectiveness of a professional development and curricular intervention designed to improve the science achievement of all students, especially English learners. She is currently working on another NSF-funded project to develop fifth grade science instructional materials aligned to the Next Generation Science Standards for English learners in California and New Jersey.

 

 
Marco Bravo, PhD, Santa Clara University Breakout Session: Supporting English Learners acquiring the Language of Science and Science Learning Marco A. Bravo received his bachelor's degree from Santa Clara University (1994) and Master’s degree in Human Development and Psychology from Harvard University (1995) where he conducted research in the areas of bilingualism and early childhood reading development. In 2003 Dr. Bravo completed his doctoral studies at the University of California Berkeley Graduate School of Education in Language, Literacy and Culture. He was a Postdoctoral Fellow (2003) at the Lawrence Hall of Science where he authored several children's science trade books as part of a research and curriculum development project aimed at testing the possibilities and limits of science and literacy integration. He is a former Spanish/English bilingual first grade teacher and Adult ESL instructor. His current research is funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of Education. This quasi-experimental design study probes pre-service teacher dispositions toward teaching science to diverse learners, particularly English Learners.

Marco Bravo, PhD, Santa Clara University

Breakout Session: Supporting English Learners acquiring the Language of Science and Science Learning

Marco A. Bravo received his bachelor's degree from Santa Clara University (1994) and Master’s degree in Human Development and Psychology from Harvard University (1995) where he conducted research in the areas of bilingualism and early childhood reading development. In 2003 Dr. Bravo completed his doctoral studies at the University of California Berkeley Graduate School of Education in Language, Literacy and Culture. He was a Postdoctoral Fellow (2003) at the Lawrence Hall of Science where he authored several children's science trade books as part of a research and curriculum development project aimed at testing the possibilities and limits of science and literacy integration. He is a former Spanish/English bilingual first grade teacher and Adult ESL instructor. His current research is funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of Education. This quasi-experimental design study probes pre-service teacher dispositions toward teaching science to diverse learners, particularly English Learners.

Jorge Solis, PhD, University of Texas, San Antonio Breakout Session: Supporting English Learners acquiring the Language of Science and Science Learning Jorge L. Solis holds a PhD in Language, Literacy, and Culture from the University of California, Berkeley and an A.B. in Public Policy from Stanford University. He is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Bicultural-Bilingual Studies in the College of Education and Human Development at the University of Texas at San Antonio. His research interests include the development of academic literacy practices with second-language learners, preparing novice bilingual teachers, tensions and adaptations of classroom learning activity, and understanding the academic transitions of older, school-age language minority students.  He is currently collaborating on two related projects developing effective ways to integrate science-language pedagogy with elementary and secondary school pre-service teachers working with English learners and bilingual students. He is Co-Principal Investigator of Secondary Science Teaching for English Language and Literacy (SSTELLA). SSTELLA is a National Science Foundation DRK-12 longitudinal study examining the impact of the integration of second-language teaching pedagogy with novice secondary school science teachers working with English Language Learners.

Jorge Solis, PhD, University of Texas, San Antonio

Breakout Session: Supporting English Learners acquiring the Language of Science and Science Learning

Jorge L. Solis holds a PhD in Language, Literacy, and Culture from the University of California, Berkeley and an A.B. in Public Policy from Stanford University. He is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Bicultural-Bilingual Studies in the College of Education and Human Development at the University of Texas at San Antonio. His research interests include the development of academic literacy practices with second-language learners, preparing novice bilingual teachers, tensions and adaptations of classroom learning activity, and understanding the academic transitions of older, school-age language minority students.  He is currently collaborating on two related projects developing effective ways to integrate science-language pedagogy with elementary and secondary school pre-service teachers working with English learners and bilingual students. He is Co-Principal Investigator of Secondary Science Teaching for English Language and Literacy (SSTELLA). SSTELLA is a National Science Foundation DRK-12 longitudinal study examining the impact of the integration of second-language teaching pedagogy with novice secondary school science teachers working with English Language Learners.

Claudia Rodriguez-Mojica, PhD, Santa Clara University Breakout Session: Supporting English Learners in Composing Argumentative Texts Claudia Rodriguez-Mojica earned her bachelor's degree from UC Davis and a Teaching Credential from CSU Sacramento with a bilingual authorization. She attended Stanford University where she earned a Master's in Linguistics and a Ph.D. in Curriculum Studies and Teacher Education. Dr. Rodriguez-Mojica’s research focuses on instructional scaffolds to support English learners’ access and engagement with academic content and bilingual teachers' entry into bilingual education. Dr. Rodriguez-Mojica was a dual language elementary school teacher and is currently an Assistant Professor at Santa Clara University. She coordinates the SEMILLA Fellowship program and teaches courses on second language acquisition, literacy and bilingual methods.

Claudia Rodriguez-Mojica, PhD, Santa Clara University

Breakout Session: Supporting English Learners in Composing Argumentative Texts

Claudia Rodriguez-Mojica earned her bachelor's degree from UC Davis and a Teaching Credential from CSU Sacramento with a bilingual authorization. She attended Stanford University where she earned a Master's in Linguistics and a Ph.D. in Curriculum Studies and Teacher Education. Dr. Rodriguez-Mojica’s research focuses on instructional scaffolds to support English learners’ access and engagement with academic content and bilingual teachers' entry into bilingual education.

Dr. Rodriguez-Mojica was a dual language elementary school teacher and is currently an Assistant Professor at Santa Clara University. She coordinates the SEMILLA Fellowship program and teaches courses on second language acquisition, literacy and bilingual methods.

George Bunch, PhD, University of California, Santa Cruz Breakout Session: The Language and Literacy Demands of the Common Core ELA Standards; Realizing Opportunities for English Learners George C. Bunch, an experienced K-12 teacher and teacher educator, received a BA in English and American Studies from Georgetown University, MA in bilingual education and TESOL from the University of Maryland Baltimore County, and PhD in educational linguistics from Stanford University. His research focuses on language and literacy challenges and opportunities for language minority students in K-12 and higher education, and on policies and practices designed to serve such students. Active in efforts to prepare teachers to work with English learners, he has served on the English Learner Advisory Panel for the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. Dr. Bunch is a founding partner of the Understanding Language Initiative, formed to heighten awareness of the role of language for English learners in the Common Core and Next Generation Science Standards. His current research explores promising pedagogical approaches for English learners in the new standards era, preparing secondary science teachers for linguistically diverse students, and the language and literacy demands of academic and professional preparation programs in community colleges.

George Bunch, PhD, University of California, Santa Cruz

Breakout Session: The Language and Literacy Demands of the Common Core ELA Standards; Realizing Opportunities for English Learners

George C. Bunch, an experienced K-12 teacher and teacher educator, received a BA in English and American Studies from Georgetown University, MA in bilingual education and TESOL from the University of Maryland Baltimore County, and PhD in educational linguistics from Stanford University. His research focuses on language and literacy challenges and opportunities for language minority students in K-12 and higher education, and on policies and practices designed to serve such students. Active in efforts to prepare teachers to work with English learners, he has served on the English Learner Advisory Panel for the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. Dr. Bunch is a founding partner of the Understanding Language Initiative, formed to heighten awareness of the role of language for English learners in the Common Core and Next Generation Science Standards. His current research explores promising pedagogical approaches for English learners in the new standards era, preparing secondary science teachers for linguistically diverse students, and the language and literacy demands of academic and professional preparation programs in community colleges.

Aida Walqui, PhD, Director, Teacher Professional Development, WestEd Breakout Session: Helping Students find their Voice: Exploring Civil Rights Aida Walqui is a native of Peru where she received her Licenciatura in Literature from the Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Peru. She holds an MA in sociolinguistics from Georgetown University and a PhD in language, literacy, and culture from Stanford University. Walqui joined WestEd in 1999 to initiate the Teacher Professional Development Program. As Director of Teacher Professional Development, she is responsible for collaborating on ongoing WestEd teacher professional development efforts and leading the evolution of an organizational commitment to support teachers throughout their careers—from recruitment and pre-service through induction and life-long learning. Previously, Walqui taught in the Division of Education at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and the School of Education at Stanford University, where she coordinated the Cross-Cultural, Linguistic, and Academic Development emphasis in the STEP program. She has also taught in other universities in Peru, Mexico, England, and the United States.

Aida Walqui, PhD, Director, Teacher Professional Development, WestEd

Breakout Session: Helping Students find their Voice: Exploring Civil Rights

Aida Walqui is a native of Peru where she received her Licenciatura in Literature from the Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Peru. She holds an MA in sociolinguistics from Georgetown University and a PhD in language, literacy, and culture from Stanford University. Walqui joined WestEd in 1999 to initiate the Teacher Professional Development Program. As Director of Teacher Professional Development, she is responsible for collaborating on ongoing WestEd teacher professional development efforts and leading the evolution of an organizational commitment to support teachers throughout their careers—from recruitment and pre-service through induction and life-long learning.

Previously, Walqui taught in the Division of Education at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and the School of Education at Stanford University, where she coordinated the Cross-Cultural, Linguistic, and Academic Development emphasis in the STEP program. She has also taught in other universities in Peru, Mexico, England, and the United States.

Ramon Martínez, PhD, Stanford University Breakout Session: Emergent Literacy in Spanish and English; Similarities and Differences Ramon Martínez earned his BA in Literature from UCSD, and MA and PhD in Education from UCLA. Dr. Martínez explores the intersections of language, race, and ideology in the public schooling experiences of students of color, with a particular focus on bi/multilingual Chicana/o and Latina/o children and youth. His research examines: (1) the everyday language and literacy practices of students of color, and the ways that these practices overlap with the forms of language and literacy privileged in academic settings; (2) the competing ideologies that inform language policy and classroom practice in urban schools, including the ways that students and teachers in these schools articulate, embody, and challenge such ideologies in their everyday interactions; and (3) the preparation of pre-service and in-service teachers to work with culturally and linguistically diverse learners. He has published articles in journals such as Linguistics and Education, Research in the Teaching of English, Anthropology & Education Quarterly, Teachers College Record, and Review of Research in Education.

Ramon Martínez, PhD, Stanford University

Breakout Session: Emergent Literacy in Spanish and English; Similarities and Differences

Ramon Martínez earned his BA in Literature from UCSD, and MA and PhD in Education from UCLA. Dr. Martínez explores the intersections of language, race, and ideology in the public schooling experiences of students of color, with a particular focus on bi/multilingual Chicana/o and Latina/o children and youth. His research examines: (1) the everyday language and literacy practices of students of color, and the ways that these practices overlap with the forms of language and literacy privileged in academic settings; (2) the competing ideologies that inform language policy and classroom practice in urban schools, including the ways that students and teachers in these schools articulate, embody, and challenge such ideologies in their everyday interactions; and (3) the preparation of pre-service and in-service teachers to work with culturally and linguistically diverse learners. He has published articles in journals such as Linguistics and Education, Research in the Teaching of English, Anthropology & Education Quarterly, Teachers College Record, and Review of Research in Education.

Allison Briceño, EdD, San Jose State University Breakout Session: Emergent Literacy in Spanish and English; Similarities and Differences Allison Briceño received her Bachelor’s degree in English and Spanish from the University of Pennsylvania, MA in Policy & Organizational Leadership Studies from Stanford University, and EdD in Second Language Acquisition from the University of San Francisco. She is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Teacher Education at San José State University, where she coordinates the Bilingual Authorization for the Multiple Subject Teaching Credential/MA Program. Prior to SJSU, Dr. Briceño was a Reading Recovery and Descubriendo la Lectura Teacher Leader and bilingual teacher in California public schools for over a decade. Dr. Briceño studies how bilingual and biliterate students use all of their linguistic resources to understand text, and she explores the literacy practices of English learners and their teachers. Dr. Briceño teaches courses related to literacy and second language acquisition.

Allison Briceño, EdD, San Jose State University

Breakout Session: Emergent Literacy in Spanish and English; Similarities and Differences

Allison Briceño received her Bachelor’s degree in English and Spanish from the University of Pennsylvania, MA in Policy & Organizational Leadership Studies from Stanford University, and EdD in Second Language Acquisition from the University of San Francisco. She is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Teacher Education at San José State University, where she coordinates the Bilingual Authorization for the Multiple Subject Teaching Credential/MA Program. Prior to SJSU, Dr. Briceño was a Reading Recovery and Descubriendo la Lectura Teacher Leader and bilingual teacher in California public schools for over a decade. Dr. Briceño studies how bilingual and biliterate students use all of their linguistic resources to understand text, and she explores the literacy practices of English learners and their teachers. Dr. Briceño teaches courses related to literacy and second language acquisition.

Lynette Parker, J.D., Santa Clara University Breakout Session: Changes to Immigration Policies and Practices Which Affect Children, Families and Schools Lynette Parker has been teaching and supervising law students handling immigration cases at the Katharine and George Alexander Community Law Center since 2000, and she also serves as a lecturer in the law school. She provides technical support to attorneys on political asylum, VAWA, U visa and T visa cases. She has authored a law review article published by Georgetown Immigration Law Journal titled “Increasing Law Students Effectiveness When Representing Traumatized Clients: A Case Study of the Katharine & George Alexander Community Law Center.” Prior to joining the KGACLC, Parker worked as a staff attorney at the International Institute of the East Bay for 10 years. She has extensive experience representing asylum applicants, as well as battered spouses and children who are self-petitioning for permanent residence, victims of crimes who are petitioning for U visas, and victims of human trafficking who are petitioning for T visas. Parker spent three years of her childhood in Puerto Rico and five years in India. She has traveled to China, Nicaragua, Chiapas, Mexico, and Colombia, and is fluent in Spanish. She received her B.A., from The College of Wooster, M.A. from the University of California, Berkeley, and J.D. from the University of California Hastings College of the Law.

Lynette Parker, J.D., Santa Clara University

Breakout Session: Changes to Immigration Policies and Practices Which Affect Children, Families and Schools

Lynette Parker has been teaching and supervising law students handling immigration cases at the Katharine and George Alexander Community Law Center since 2000, and she also serves as a lecturer in the law school. She provides technical support to attorneys on political asylum, VAWA, U visa and T visa cases. She has authored a law review article published by Georgetown Immigration Law Journal titled “Increasing Law Students Effectiveness When Representing Traumatized Clients: A Case Study of the Katharine & George Alexander Community Law Center.”

Prior to joining the KGACLC, Parker worked as a staff attorney at the International Institute of the East Bay for 10 years. She has extensive experience representing asylum applicants, as well as battered spouses and children who are self-petitioning for permanent residence, victims of crimes who are petitioning for U visas, and victims of human trafficking who are petitioning for T visas. Parker spent three years of her childhood in Puerto Rico and five years in India. She has traveled to China, Nicaragua, Chiapas, Mexico, and Colombia, and is fluent in Spanish. She received her B.A., from The College of Wooster, M.A. from the University of California, Berkeley, and J.D. from the University of California Hastings College of the Law.

Lucilla Ramos-Sánchez, PhD, Santa Clara University Breakout Session: Psychological Issues of Working with Immigrant Students and Families in Uncertain Times Lucila Ramos-Sánchez was born in Mexico and raised in Northern California. She received a Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts in Psychology from California State University, Chico. She received a master's degree and doctorate from the University of California, Santa Barbara in Counseling/Clinical/School Psychology, with an emphasis in counseling psychology. Ramos-Sánchez joined the Santa Clara University faculty in fall of 2000 and holds dual teaching positions in the Departments of Counseling Psychology and Psychology. Her research interests focus on Latino mental health, specifically examining variables that affect counselor credibility, the effects of bilingualism in the counseling process, and stress associated with acculturation issues. Her research also includes the examination of the relationship between self-efficacy and academic achievement of Mexican-American high school and college students. From a clinical perspective, her interest is in the area of multicultural counseling.

Lucilla Ramos-Sánchez, PhD, Santa Clara University

Breakout Session: Psychological Issues of Working with Immigrant Students and Families in Uncertain Times

Lucila Ramos-Sánchez was born in Mexico and raised in Northern California. She received a Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts in Psychology from California State University, Chico. She received a master's degree and doctorate from the University of California, Santa Barbara in Counseling/Clinical/School Psychology, with an emphasis in counseling psychology. Ramos-Sánchez joined the Santa Clara University faculty in fall of 2000 and holds dual teaching positions in the Departments of Counseling Psychology and Psychology. Her research interests focus on Latino mental health, specifically examining variables that affect counselor credibility, the effects of bilingualism in the counseling process, and stress associated with acculturation issues. Her research also includes the examination of the relationship between self-efficacy and academic achievement of Mexican-American high school and college students. From a clinical perspective, her interest is in the area of multicultural counseling.

Héctor Sánchez-Flores, Executive Director, National Compadres Network Breakout Session: Psychological Issues of Working with Immigrant Students and Families in Uncertain Times Héctor Sánchez-Flores is the executive director of the National Compadres Network (NCN), where he leads the organization’s work to promote methods that build upon the cultural and personal assets of people and communities, especially for young men of color, to intervene and prevent violence, truancy, teen pregnancy and other life-limiting outcomes for children, teens, and their families. NCN currently operates in numerous program areas, with the support of federal, state or private grants.  Héctor Sánchez - Flores is co-author of the brown paper “Lifting Latinos Up By Their ‘Rootstraps:’ Moving Beyond Trauma Through A Healing-Informed Framework for Latino Boys and Men."  

Héctor Sánchez-Flores, Executive Director, National Compadres Network

Breakout Session: Psychological Issues of Working with Immigrant Students and Families in Uncertain Times

Héctor Sánchez-Flores is the executive director of the National Compadres Network (NCN), where he leads the organization’s work to promote methods that build upon the cultural and personal assets of people and communities, especially for young men of color, to intervene and prevent violence, truancy, teen pregnancy and other life-limiting outcomes for children, teens, and their families. NCN currently operates in numerous program areas, with the support of federal, state or private grants.

 Héctor Sánchez - Flores is co-author of the brown paper “Lifting Latinos Up By Their ‘Rootstraps:’ Moving Beyond Trauma Through A Healing-Informed Framework for Latino Boys and Men."

 

Breakout Session Details:

 

Supporting English Language Learners in the Mathematics Classroom

Presenter: Dr. Kathy Stoehr, Santa Clara University

Presenter: Dr. Eduardo Mosqueda, University of California Santa Cruz

This session will focus on the language demands that English Language Learners face in the mathematics classroom as well as the many resources they bring to the classroom. Discussions will center on how to provide scaffolded opportunities for English Language learners to support their learning of English as they solve mathematics problems and communicate mathematical reasoning and understanding.

 

Designing NGSS-aligned Lessons for English Learners in Elementary School

Presenter: Dr. Lorena Llosa, New York University

Presenter will discuss the principles informing the development of “Science and Integrated Language” (SAIL), a fifth grade science curriculum for English learners aligned to the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS).  Using examples from SAIL, the presenter will illustrate how to design science lessons that blend the three dimensions promoted by NGSS—disciplinary core ideas, crosscutting concepts, and science and engineering practices—in ways that create a rich context for language use and development.

 

Supporting English Learners acquiring the Language of Science and Science Learning

Presenter: Dr. Marco Bravo, Santa Clara University

Presenter: Dr. Jorge Solis, University of Texas, San Antonio

Presenters will share examples of research-based approaches that allow science teachers to address the language and science learning needs of English learners. In the workshop, classroom teachers will be exposed to models for teaching scientific argumentation, science vocabulary and building reading comprehension of science texts for English learners. 

 

Supporting English Learners in Composing Argumentative Texts

Presenter: Dr. Claudia Rodriguez-Mojica, Santa Clara University

This session will focus on supporting English learners to compose argumentative writing across the content areas. We will explore the components of an argument and practice analyzing English learner argumentative writing using the Argumentation Analysis Tool. By analyzing written arguments, we will identify challenges English learners face in composing arguments and share language scaffolds and lesson plan ideas to address their various needs. 

 

The Language and Literacy Demands of the Common Core ELA Standards: Realizing Opportunities for English Learners

Presenter: Dr. George Bunch, University of California, Santa Cruz

This workshop explores how English learners can be simultaneously challenged and supported in engaging with the language and literacy practices called for by the Common Core ELA standards. Sample activities will be demonstrated from a middle school unit that scaffolds students’ attention to language and meaning making in complex texts in English. Teachers’ and students’ perspectives from a pilot of this unit in three districts across the U.S. will be shared.

 

Helping Students find their Voice: Exploring Civil Rights

Presenter: Dr. Aida Walqui, WestED

This session will focus on a recently designed unit that addresses issues of youth activism throughout the country.

 

Emergent Literacy in Spanish and English: Similarities and Differences

Presenter: Dr. Allison Briceño, San Jose State University

Presenter:  Dr. Ramon Martínez , Stanford University

Teaching students to read in two languages is complex and limited information is available to teachers. This session will explore the similarities and differences in teaching students to learn to read and write in Spanish and English. We will look at aspects of the two languages –such as sentence structure, vocabulary and how children create meaning from texts– and consider instructional implications using video and student work. For K-2 bilingual/dual language educators.

 

Psychological issues of working with immigrant students and families in uncertain times

Presenter: Lucila Ramos-Sánchez, Santa Clara University

Presenter: Héctor Sánchez-Flores, National Compadres Network

This session will address common stressors associated with immigrant and undocumented individuals. It will also speak to the role professional and institutions play in working with and advocating for these individuals.

 

Changes to Immigration Policies and Practices Which Affect Children, Families and Schools

Presenter: Lynette Parker J.D., Santa Clara University

This workshop will address changes to immigration policies and practices under the new administration. It will focus on those policies and practices that affect children and families. The workshop will also look at how schools are affected and how the schools can support their students and families.