Keynote Speaker: Jeff Duncan-Andrade, PhD

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Jeff Duncan-Andrade, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Raza Studies and Education Administration and Interdisciplinary Studies. In addition to these duties, he continues as a high school teacher in East Oakland where for the past 18 years he has practiced and studied the use of critical pedagogy in urban schools. He currently teaches English at Mandela High School in East Oakland. Before joining the faculty at SFSU, Duncan-Andrade taught English and coached in the Oakland public schools for 10 years, and completed his doctoral studies at the University of California, Berkeley. Duncan-Andrade has lectured around the world about the elements of effective teaching in schools serving poor and working class children.

He works closely with teachers, school site leaders, and school district officials nationally, and as far abroad as Brazil and New Zealand, to help them develop classroom practices and school cultures that foster self-confidence, esteem, and academic success among all students. His research interests and publications span the areas of urban schooling and curriculum change, urban teacher development and retention, critical pedagogy, and cultural and ethnic studies. He has authored numerous journal articles and book chapters on the conditions of urban education, urban teacher support and development, and effective pedagogy in urban settings (see http://cci.sfsu.edu/taxonomy/term/68) that have been published in leading journals such as Harvard Educational Review and Qualitative Studies in Education.

He recently completed two books, The Art of Critical Pedagogy: Possibilities for Moving from Theory to Practice in Urban Schools and What a Coach Can Teach a Teacher, with Peter Lang Publishing. These books focus on effective pedagogical strategies for urban schools. He is currently completing his third book on the core competencies of highly effective urban educators with Routledge Press.

Keynote Speaker: Karen Valdes, PhD

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Dr. Karen Valdes serves as the assistant superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction in the Menifee Union School District. Prior to her current post, she served as a curriculum coordinator and then regional director for the Riverside County Office of Education. Valdes received her bachelor’s degree and elementary credential, as well as her master’s degree, in educational psychology, with an emphasis in special education, from Loyola Marymount University. She holds special education credentials as well as a resource specialist program certificate. In addition, she has a bilingual certificate of competence. She completed her doctorate in organizational leadership at Argosy University. Presently, she is an adjunct professor at Pepperdine University.

Valdes started her career in the Lennox School District in Los Angeles. She held teaching positions in Norwalk La Mirada Unified School District and Temecula Valley Unified School District. Twice named Teacher of the Year at Temecula Valley Unified School District, she was named Riverside County Teacher of the Year in 1987. Dr. Valdes also worked a number of years for the United States Department of Education, in the Teacher to Teacher program.

In 2016, she was appointed by the State Board of Education to serve on the California Practitioners Advisory Panel (CPAG). Valdes is active in numerous organizations, including the Menifee Boys and Girls Club Board of Directors where she is a member. She is also a member of the Board of Directors for California Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (CASCD).

Breakout Session Speakers

Marco Bravo, PhD, Santa Clara University Breakout Session: Supporting English Learners Acquiring the Language of Science and Science Learning Marco A. Bravo received his bachelor's degree from Santa Clara University (1994) and Master’s degree in Human Development and Psychology from Harvard University (1995) where he conducted research in the areas of bilingualism and early childhood reading development. In 2003 Dr. Bravo completed his doctoral studies at the University of California Berkeley Graduate School of Education in Language, Literacy and Culture. He was a Postdoctoral Fellow (2003) at the Lawrence Hall of Science where he authored several children's science trade books as part of a research and curriculum development project aimed at testing the possibilities and limits of science and literacy integration. He is a former Spanish/English bilingual first grade teacher and Adult ESL instructor. His current research is funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of Education. This quasi-experimental design study probes pre-service teacher dispositions toward teaching science to diverse learners, particularly English Learners.

Marco Bravo, PhD, Santa Clara University

Breakout Session: Supporting English Learners Acquiring the Language of Science and Science Learning

Marco A. Bravo received his bachelor's degree from Santa Clara University (1994) and Master’s degree in Human Development and Psychology from Harvard University (1995) where he conducted research in the areas of bilingualism and early childhood reading development. In 2003 Dr. Bravo completed his doctoral studies at the University of California Berkeley Graduate School of Education in Language, Literacy and Culture. He was a Postdoctoral Fellow (2003) at the Lawrence Hall of Science where he authored several children's science trade books as part of a research and curriculum development project aimed at testing the possibilities and limits of science and literacy integration. He is a former Spanish/English bilingual first grade teacher and Adult ESL instructor. His current research is funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of Education. This quasi-experimental design study probes pre-service teacher dispositions toward teaching science to diverse learners, particularly English Learners.

Gilberto Q. Conchas, PhD, Executive Director of the Career Academy Support Network Gilberto Q. Conchas is currently Executive Director of the Career Academy Support Network (CASN) at U.C. Berkeley and Associate Professor and Chancellor’s Fellow at the University of California, Irvine.  In addition, he is Faculty Equity and Diversity Advisor for UCI.  Dr. Conchas’ work focuses on inequality with an emphasis on urban schooling systems.  His research illuminates student voices and perspectives as a means to make meaning of their lives in urban communities and schools. Dr. Conchas focuses on the sociocultural processes within the school context that structure variations in educational opportunity for low-income immigrant and U.S-born Latino, Asian American, and African American youth. Numerous scholarly journals, including the Harvard Educational Review, Research in Sociology of Education, Urban Education, Youth & Society, and Teachers College Record, have published Dr. Conchas’ work.  He is the author of The Color of Success: Race and High-Achieving Urban Youth (2006), Small Schools and Urban Youth: Using the Power of School Culture to Engage Youth (2008), and StreetSmart SchoolSmart: Urban Poverty and the Education of Boys of Color (forthcoming). Conchas obtained a Ph.D. and M.A. in Sociology from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor and a B.A. in Sociology from the University of California, Berkeley.

Gilberto Q. Conchas, PhD, Executive Director of the Career Academy Support Network

Gilberto Q. Conchas is currently Executive Director of the Career Academy Support Network (CASN) at U.C. Berkeley and Associate Professor and Chancellor’s Fellow at the University of California, Irvine.  In addition, he is Faculty Equity and Diversity Advisor for UCI. 

Dr. Conchas’ work focuses on inequality with an emphasis on urban schooling systems.  His research illuminates student voices and perspectives as a means to make meaning of their lives in urban communities and schools. Dr. Conchas focuses on the sociocultural processes within the school context that structure variations in educational opportunity for low-income immigrant and U.S-born Latino, Asian American, and African American youth. Numerous scholarly journals, including the Harvard Educational Review, Research in Sociology of Education, Urban Education, Youth & Society, and Teachers College Record, have published Dr. Conchas’ work.  He is the author of The Color of Success: Race and High-Achieving Urban Youth (2006), Small Schools and Urban Youth: Using the Power of School Culture to Engage Youth (2008), and StreetSmart SchoolSmart: Urban Poverty and the Education of Boys of Color (forthcoming). Conchas obtained a Ph.D. and M.A. in Sociology from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor and a B.A. in Sociology from the University of California, Berkeley.

Claudia Rodriguez-Mojica, PhD, Santa Clara University Breakout Session: Supporting English Learners in Composing Argumentative Texts Claudia Rodriguez-Mojica earned her bachelor's degree from UC Davis and a Teaching Credential from CSU Sacramento with a bilingual authorization. She attended Stanford University where she earned a Master's in Linguistics and a Ph.D. in Curriculum Studies and Teacher Education. Dr. Rodriguez-Mojica’s research focuses on instructional scaffolds to support English learners’ access and engagement with academic content and bilingual teachers' entry into bilingual education. Dr. Rodriguez-Mojica was a dual language elementary school teacher and is currently an Assistant Professor at Santa Clara University. She coordinates the SEMILLA Fellowship program and teaches courses on second language acquisition, literacy and bilingual methods.

Claudia Rodriguez-Mojica, PhD, Santa Clara University

Breakout Session: Supporting English Learners in Composing Argumentative Texts

Claudia Rodriguez-Mojica earned her bachelor's degree from UC Davis and a Teaching Credential from CSU Sacramento with a bilingual authorization. She attended Stanford University where she earned a Master's in Linguistics and a Ph.D. in Curriculum Studies and Teacher Education. Dr. Rodriguez-Mojica’s research focuses on instructional scaffolds to support English learners’ access and engagement with academic content and bilingual teachers' entry into bilingual education.

Dr. Rodriguez-Mojica was a dual language elementary school teacher and is currently an Assistant Professor at Santa Clara University. She coordinates the SEMILLA Fellowship program and teaches courses on second language acquisition, literacy and bilingual methods.

Reyes Quazada, EdD, University of San Diego Reyes Quezada, Ed.D., writes and teaches in the areas of Bilingual Education, K-12 Teacher Recruitment, Issues on Faculty of Color, Instructional Models, Home-School Community Partnerships, Experiential Education and Physical Education Through Adventure Based Programs. He came to the University of San Diego in 1999 from the University of Redlands and prior to that he taught at California State University, Stanislaus. He has also lectured for California State University San Bernardino, San Diego State University and the Washington Center for Academic Seminars in Washington D.C. Among his articles are "K-12 Teacher Recruitment: Implications for Teacher Education" (Teacher Education Quarterly), "Developing Diverse Faculty in Culturally Proficient Education Programs" (Journal of Multicultural Education), and "Forming Home-School Community Partnerships Among Bilingual Communities" (The School Community Journal).

Reyes Quazada, EdD, University of San Diego

Reyes Quezada, Ed.D., writes and teaches in the areas of Bilingual Education, K-12 Teacher Recruitment, Issues on Faculty of Color, Instructional Models, Home-School Community Partnerships, Experiential Education and Physical Education Through Adventure Based Programs. He came to the University of San Diego in 1999 from the University of Redlands and prior to that he taught at California State University, Stanislaus. He has also lectured for California State University San Bernardino, San Diego State University and the Washington Center for Academic Seminars in Washington D.C. Among his articles are "K-12 Teacher Recruitment: Implications for Teacher Education" (Teacher Education Quarterly), "Developing Diverse Faculty in Culturally Proficient Education Programs" (Journal of Multicultural Education), and "Forming Home-School Community Partnerships Among Bilingual Communities" (The School Community Journal).

Magaly Lavadenz, PhD, Loyola Marymount University Magaly Lavadenz is currently a professor in the Department of Educational Leadership at Loyola Marymount University. She is also the Founding Director of LMU’s Center for Equity English Learners (CEEL). Dr. Lavadenz has held leadership positions in numerous education related associations. She is a past president of the California Association for Bilingual Education (CABE), founding president of the California Association of Bilingual Teacher Educators (CABTE) and is currently President for the California Council on Teacher Education. Born in Cuba, she is a former bilingual classroom teacher and ESL Teacher Specialist at the K-12 levels. Her research interests include the education of Latino and bilingual teachers, the experiences of the Central American immigrant community, public policy affecting language use and education, and biliteracy development. Dr. Lavadenz completed her B.S. in Elementary Education from Oakland University in Michigan, an M.A. in Educational Psychology and Counseling from California State University, Northridge and a Ph.D. in Education, specializing in Language, Literacy and Learning from the University of Southern California.

Magaly Lavadenz, PhD, Loyola Marymount University

Magaly Lavadenz is currently a professor in the Department of Educational Leadership at Loyola Marymount University. She is also the Founding Director of LMU’s Center for Equity English Learners (CEEL). Dr. Lavadenz has held leadership positions in numerous education related associations. She is a past president of the California Association for Bilingual Education (CABE), founding president of the California Association of Bilingual Teacher Educators (CABTE) and is currently President for the California Council on Teacher Education.

Born in Cuba, she is a former bilingual classroom teacher and ESL Teacher Specialist at the K-12 levels. Her research interests include the education of Latino and bilingual teachers, the experiences of the Central American immigrant community, public policy affecting language use and education, and biliteracy development.

Dr. Lavadenz completed her B.S. in Elementary Education from Oakland University in Michigan, an M.A. in Educational Psychology and Counseling from California State University, Northridge and a Ph.D. in Education, specializing in Language, Literacy and Learning from the University of Southern California.

Kathleen Jablon Stoehr, PhD, Stanford University Kathleen Jablon Stoehr is a native Californian who earned her Bachelor’s Degree from San Diego State University in Psychology and her Teaching Credential from Dominican University of California. After teaching elementary and middle school for ten years in California, Texas, Australia and Chile, she earned her Ph.D. in Teaching and Teacher Education in Mathematics Education from the University of Arizona in May 2014. Her teaching philosophy is to equip preservice teachers to embrace the cultural and linguistic differences of today’s classrooms as well as issues of equity and social justice. In addition, her teaching focuses on leveraging students’ home and community-based knowledge and experiences to support student learning. Kathleen’s research interests are on a variety of issues that relate to preservice and early career teachers’ processes and understandings of learning to teach. Through the use of narrative inquiry, she has explored equity and social justice issues of language, race, culture, and gender that occur in the classroom. Her primary research involves comprehensive and detailed studies of the experiences of mathematics anxiety that some women elementary preservice teachers encounter.

Kathleen Jablon Stoehr, PhD, Stanford University

Kathleen Jablon Stoehr is a native Californian who earned her Bachelor’s Degree from San Diego State University in Psychology and her Teaching Credential from Dominican University of California. After teaching elementary and middle school for ten years in California, Texas, Australia and Chile, she earned her Ph.D. in Teaching and Teacher Education in Mathematics Education from the University of Arizona in May 2014. Her teaching philosophy is to equip preservice teachers to embrace the cultural and linguistic differences of today’s classrooms as well as issues of equity and social justice. In addition, her teaching focuses on leveraging students’ home and community-based knowledge and experiences to support student learning.

Kathleen’s research interests are on a variety of issues that relate to preservice and early career teachers’ processes and understandings of learning to teach. Through the use of narrative inquiry, she has explored equity and social justice issues of language, race, culture, and gender that occur in the classroom. Her primary research involves comprehensive and detailed studies of the experiences of mathematics anxiety that some women elementary preservice teachers encounter.

Maria Madrigal, Voices Mount Pleasant Providing the opportunity to students to learn in both Spanish and English is something that every child should have the opportunity to do. Often times society does not place value in the Latino culture and students grow up feeling ashamed of their roots instead of seeing this as an asset. I feel that as a first generation college graduate it is my duty to give back to my community. To be a model to students and to let them know that it is possible and they can attain whatever they set their mind to. Life will bring struggles, but a Si se puede attitude is necessary to achieve greatness! I am currently the principal of Voices Mount Pleasant. A dual immersion school located in the eastside of San Jose. At Voices we value language and know that a student not only has to have high academic expectations but also need to build a  strong character. This is done through our school values; si se puede attitude, In Lak'ech, Escolaridad, and Activismo.

Maria Madrigal, Voices Mount Pleasant

Providing the opportunity to students to learn in both Spanish and English is something that every child should have the opportunity to do. Often times society does not place value in the Latino culture and students grow up feeling ashamed of their roots instead of seeing this as an asset. I feel that as a first generation college graduate it is my duty to give back to my community. To be a model to students and to let them know that it is possible and they can attain whatever they set their mind to. Life will bring struggles, but a Si se puede attitude is necessary to achieve greatness!

I am currently the principal of Voices Mount Pleasant. A dual immersion school located in the eastside of San Jose. At Voices we value language and know that a student not only has to have high academic expectations but also need to build a  strong character. This is done through our school values; si se puede attitude, In Lak'ech, Escolaridad, and Activismo.

Ramón Antonio Martinez, Stanford University Ramón Antonio Martínez comes to Stanford University from the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Texas at Austin where he was assistant professor of Language and Literacy Studies. There he was affiliated with the Bilingual/Bicultural Education program and the Department of Mexican American and Latina/o Studies. His research explores the intersections of language, race, and ideology in the public schooling experiences of students of color, with a particular focus on bi/multilingual Chicana/o and Latina/o children and youth. Martínez examines how students’ everyday language practices overlap with the forms of language and literacy privileged in academic settings, how competing ideologies inform language policy and classroom practice in urban schools, and how pre-service teachers are prepared to teach culturally and linguistically diverse learners. He has published articles in journals such as Linguistics and Education, Research in the Teaching of English, Anthropology & Education Quarterly, Teachers College Record, and Review of Research in Education.

Ramón Antonio Martinez, Stanford University

Ramón Antonio Martínez comes to Stanford University from the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Texas at Austin where he was assistant professor of Language and Literacy Studies. There he was affiliated with the Bilingual/Bicultural Education program and the Department of Mexican American and Latina/o Studies. His research explores the intersections of language, race, and ideology in the public schooling experiences of students of color, with a particular focus on bi/multilingual Chicana/o and Latina/o children and youth. Martínez examines how students’ everyday language practices overlap with the forms of language and literacy privileged in academic settings, how competing ideologies inform language policy and classroom practice in urban schools, and how pre-service teachers are prepared to teach culturally and linguistically diverse learners. He has published articles in journals such as Linguistics and Education, Research in the Teaching of English, Anthropology & Education Quarterly, Teachers College Record, and Review of Research in Education.

Patrick Sanchez, Newark Unified School District Pat Sánchez was selected as Superintendent at Newark Unified School District in 2016, bringing with him over 20 years of comprehensive administrative experience and a proven track record of transforming four inner city schools and one inner city school district through collaborative leadership and community engagement. Most recently, he was named Latino Superintendent of the Year by the Association of Latino Administrators and Superintendents (ALAS) in 2015. Former President Obama recognized him as a Champion of Change – which included an invitation to the White House to share ideas and insights. Former U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan applauded Superintendent Sánchez with national recognition for his collaborative work, and encouraged replication of his model of supporting parental involvement and engendering community support across the country. Originally from San Luis, Colorado, he is the youngest of seven children and the first person in his family to graduate from high school, college, and to receive a graduate degree. He earned a Bachelor of Arts in secondary industrial science and a general education license from Colorado State University. He obtained a vocational instructor license in trades and industry. Superintendent Sánchez completed his Master of Arts in administration, supervision and curriculum development at the University of Colorado at Denver, and went on to obtain his professional principal license

Patrick Sanchez, Newark Unified School District

Pat Sánchez was selected as Superintendent at Newark Unified School District in 2016, bringing with him over 20 years of comprehensive administrative experience and a proven track record of transforming four inner city schools and one inner city school district through collaborative leadership and community engagement.

Most recently, he was named Latino Superintendent of the Year by the Association of Latino Administrators and Superintendents (ALAS) in 2015. Former President Obama recognized him as a Champion of Change – which included an invitation to the White House to share ideas and insights. Former U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan applauded Superintendent Sánchez with national recognition for his collaborative work, and encouraged replication of his model of supporting parental involvement and engendering community support across the country.

Originally from San Luis, Colorado, he is the youngest of seven children and the first person in his family to graduate from high school, college, and to receive a graduate degree. He earned a Bachelor of Arts in secondary industrial science and a general education license from Colorado State University. He obtained a vocational instructor license in trades and industry. Superintendent Sánchez completed his Master of Arts in administration, supervision and curriculum development at the University of Colorado at Denver, and went on to obtain his professional principal license

Pedro Hernández-Ramos, PhD, Santa Clara University Born in New Orleans, LA, Pedro grew up in Mexico where he received a BA from Universidad Iberoamericana (a Jesuit institution) in Mexico City. He then went on to earn a Ph.D. in Mass Communication Research at Stanford University. His first job after the doctorate was as an Assistant Editor for the International Encyclopedia of Communications, a joint project of the Annenberg School for Communications of the University of Pennsylvania and Oxford University Press. Back in California, he spent two years working as a consultant on usability research for high tech companies including Microsoft and Sun Microsystems. In 1991 he joined Apple Computer as the Education Manager for Latin America & Caribbean, then served as Education Business Development Manager for Apple Pacific, and finally as the Research Manager for the Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow (ACOT) program. His research interests are in teacher's technology integration and pedagogical applications of games and simulations.

Pedro Hernández-Ramos, PhD, Santa Clara University

Born in New Orleans, LA, Pedro grew up in Mexico where he received a BA from Universidad Iberoamericana (a Jesuit institution) in Mexico City. He then went on to earn a Ph.D. in Mass Communication Research at Stanford University. His first job after the doctorate was as an Assistant Editor for the International Encyclopedia of Communications, a joint project of the Annenberg School for Communications of the University of Pennsylvania and Oxford University Press.

Back in California, he spent two years working as a consultant on usability research for high tech companies including Microsoft and Sun Microsystems. In 1991 he joined Apple Computer as the Education Manager for Latin America & Caribbean, then served as Education Business Development Manager for Apple Pacific, and finally as the Research Manager for the Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow (ACOT) program. His research interests are in teacher's technology integration and pedagogical applications of games and simulations.

Jonathan Rosa, PhD, Stanford University Jonathan Rosa is Assistant Professor in the Graduate School of Education, Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity, and, by courtesy, Departments of Anthropology and Linguistics at Stanford University. His research combines sociocultural and linguistic anthropology to study the co-naturalization of language and race as a key feature of modern governance. Specifically, he analyzes the interplay between racial marginalization, linguistic stigmatization, and educational inequity. Dr. Rosa is author of the forthcoming book, Looking like a Language, Sounding like a Race: Raciolinguistic Ideologies and the Learning of Latinidad. In addition to his formal scholarly research, Dr. Rosa is an ongoing participant in public intellectual projects focused on race, education, language, youth, (im)migration, and U.S. Latinxs. His work has appeared in scholarly journals such as the Harvard Educational Review, American Ethnologist, American Anthropologist, and the Journal of Linguistic Anthropology, as well as media outlets such as MSNBC, NPR, CNN, and Univision.

Jonathan Rosa, PhD, Stanford University

Jonathan Rosa is Assistant Professor in the Graduate School of Education, Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity, and, by courtesy, Departments of Anthropology and Linguistics at Stanford University. His research combines sociocultural and linguistic anthropology to study the co-naturalization of language and race as a key feature of modern governance. Specifically, he analyzes the interplay between racial marginalization, linguistic stigmatization, and educational inequity. Dr. Rosa is author of the forthcoming book, Looking like a Language, Sounding like a Race: Raciolinguistic Ideologies and the Learning of Latinidad. In addition to his formal scholarly research, Dr. Rosa is an ongoing participant in public intellectual projects focused on race, education, language, youth, (im)migration, and U.S. Latinxs. His work has appeared in scholarly journals such as the Harvard Educational Review, American Ethnologist, American Anthropologist, and the Journal of Linguistic Anthropology, as well as media outlets such as MSNBC, NPR, CNN, and Univision.

Oscar Jimenez-Castellanos, Arizona State University Oscar Jimenez-Castellanos is an associate professor in education policy and evaluation in Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College at Arizona State University. He is a 2016-17 Visiting Scholar at UC Berkeley, Graduate School of Education with a courtesy affiliation with Policy Analysis for California Education (PACE). Jimenez-Castellanos has published extensively in the areas of K-12 education finance, policy and parent engagement and its impact on opportunity, equity and outcomes in low-income ethnically and linguistically diverse communities. He recently completed a study on the intersection of language, poverty, ethnicity and policy in press in Review of Research in Education (RRE). Jimenez-Castellanos additionally completed a longitudinal statewide analysis in Texas focusing on secondary ELLs and school expenditures and a longitudinal statewide study in Arizona examining district revenue equity across districts. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Review of Educational Research, Journal of Education Finance, Bilingual Research Journal, Teachers College Record, and Journal of Latinos and Education. Jimenez-Castellanos co-edited Bicultural Parent Engagement: Empowerment and Advocacy (2011) published by Teachers College Press. This book received a 2012 AESA Critics Choice Award. He is currently working on a historical legislative analysis to understand the trajectory of school funding for English language learners in California.

Oscar Jimenez-Castellanos, Arizona State University

Oscar Jimenez-Castellanos is an associate professor in education policy and evaluation in Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College at Arizona State University. He is a 2016-17 Visiting Scholar at UC Berkeley, Graduate School of Education with a courtesy affiliation with Policy Analysis for California Education (PACE). Jimenez-Castellanos has published extensively in the areas of K-12 education finance, policy and parent engagement and its impact on opportunity, equity and outcomes in low-income ethnically and linguistically diverse communities. He recently completed a study on the intersection of language, poverty, ethnicity and policy in press in Review of Research in Education (RRE). Jimenez-Castellanos additionally completed a longitudinal statewide analysis in Texas focusing on secondary ELLs and school expenditures and a longitudinal statewide study in Arizona examining district revenue equity across districts. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Review of Educational Research, Journal of Education Finance, Bilingual Research Journal, Teachers College Record, and Journal of Latinos and Education. Jimenez-Castellanos co-edited Bicultural Parent Engagement: Empowerment and Advocacy (2011) published by Teachers College Press. This book received a 2012 AESA Critics Choice Award. He is currently working on a historical legislative analysis to understand the trajectory of school funding for English language learners in California.

Keith Yocam, EdD, Santa Clara University Since 2004 Keith Yocam has been teaching education courses in the Department of Education at Santa Clara University. He also works with the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at SCU designing and facilitating the Center’s Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). Keith was Senior Scientist and Worldwide Program Manager for the Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow (ACOT) program at Apple Computers, Inc. ACOT investigated the organizational, pedagogical and technical impact of student and teacher access to technology in classrooms. For ten years he served on the Board of Directors of World Links, an innovative and independent not-for-profit enterprise, which leveraged the potential of technology to bring opportunity and hope to disadvantaged youth around the world. Keith received a B.A. and Multiple Subject Teaching Credential from California State University, Fullerton. He received a M.A. in Interdisciplinary Education with an emphasis in Learning with Technology from Santa Clara University. He has 11 years of teaching experience as an elementary school teacher, science resource specialist, and district computer mentor teacher

Keith Yocam, EdD, Santa Clara University

Since 2004 Keith Yocam has been teaching education courses in the Department of Education at Santa Clara University. He also works with the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at SCU designing and facilitating the Center’s Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs).

Keith was Senior Scientist and Worldwide Program Manager for the Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow (ACOT) program at Apple Computers, Inc. ACOT investigated the organizational, pedagogical and technical impact of student and teacher access to technology in classrooms. For ten years he served on the Board of Directors of World Links, an innovative and independent not-for-profit enterprise, which leveraged the potential of technology to bring opportunity and hope to disadvantaged youth around the world.

Keith received a B.A. and Multiple Subject Teaching Credential from California State University, Fullerton. He received a M.A. in Interdisciplinary Education with an emphasis in Learning with Technology from Santa Clara University. He has 11 years of teaching experience as an elementary school teacher, science resource specialist, and district computer mentor teacher

Sherry Segura, PhD, The Foundation for Hispanic Education Dr. Sherry Segura has more than 20 years of education experience. She served as a middle school language arts, ELD, and reading intervention teacher.  She spent 6 years as an instructional coach, supporting teachers in growing and developing in their craft.  She was a successful early childhood, elementary and K-8 school principal in Colorado and California.  She earned a Master of Education from the University of Houston and a Doctor of Philosophy in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Denver.  Dr. Segura was an adjunct professor in the Morgridge College of Education at the University of Denver.  She is currently the Chief Academic Officer at The Foundation for Hispanic Education in San Jose, CA.

Sherry Segura, PhD, The Foundation for Hispanic Education

Dr. Sherry Segura has more than 20 years of education experience. She served as a middle school language arts, ELD, and reading intervention teacher.  She spent 6 years as an instructional coach, supporting teachers in growing and developing in their craft.  She was a successful early childhood, elementary and K-8 school principal in Colorado and California.  She earned a Master of Education from the University of Houston and a Doctor of Philosophy in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Denver.  Dr. Segura was an adjunct professor in the Morgridge College of Education at the University of Denver.  She is currently the Chief Academic Officer at The Foundation for Hispanic Education in San Jose, CA.